Peru – Lima to Huancayo, 10 June 2011

A new day, a new town, a new epic journey.

I honestly know nothing about Huancayo, but the only reason why I am going there, is to take the epic Ferrocarril Central Andino , a rail journey that winds through the Andean mountains, a must-do journey for any train aficionado. This can be booked online, in the link I provided above, and it won’t break the bank. They only have about two to three trips every month, so be sure to check, if you decide to go on it!

The journey is amazing in several ways. It is a marvel of modern engineering, in terms of the fixed structures, like the bridges that span high mountains, and the tunnels that were cored into these mountains. Also, to make the train climb up to 4,700 km at Galera, it also had to use several techniques like the switchbacks, where it climbs the mountain by going back and forth (you have to experience it to know what I’m writing about). Btw, this railway project began in 1870. To give you an idea of how crazy it is, it takes about 12 hours to travel a horizontal distance of 332 km.

Engineering aside, the train ride had some stunning views. As the train was winding around the Andes the non-walking/hiking way, and as it went pass mountains and lakes, I realized that I was now at the ground level with some of the mountains and lakes that I saw from the plane. Isn’t that totally awesome? Apart from natural scenery, we also passed by the coal-mining town of Oroya, some 3,800 m above sea level, which was quite interesting for me. It just seems like such a nineteenth-century industry, and yet, here it was. The train was originally built for the purpose of transporting such materials to more accessible places. For more information, they give a great brochure of the highlights when you get on it.

Arriving in Huancayo was quite anti-climatic in some ways. I didn’t know what to expect from this market town in the Andes mountains, and I guess, my bad for imagining that it would not be modern. Well, when the train pulled into the station, there it was, a huge, two-storey, modern mall with modern cinemas, kfcs, and what not.

I was convinced that we could get accommodations quite easily, but apparently not. We went to our first option, and the lady didn’t seem to welcome two girls with backpacks on our bags. The second place also told us they were out of rooms. Maybe it’s not a good look to spot? (I swear we shower and looked clean and decent!) Anyway, we ended up at Hotel Turismo Huancayo , one of the older establishments in Huancayo, but still very excellent. The staff were polite, and didn’t seem to mind us like the other establishments. Their rate of USD 60 was ok for us, and included breakfast, so we checked in. The rooms were small, but comfortable, and the hot water shower works well. The interior of the hotel lobby was also really, really charming.

After settling in, we went hunting for dinner. B wanted to have something more Peruvian, and after consulting her guide, we ended up at Olimpico, which started in 1941, is one of the oldest restaurants in Huancayo, serves local delights, and is attached to Hotel Olimpico. We tried a papas a la huancaina, which is their version of potato gratin, topped with quail eggs. I had a trout done in a gratin for my entree. All in all, a very tasty and filling meal, and set us back by about 10 USD each. Do try it, it’s just beside the Plaza des Armas.

Ferrocarril Central Andino

The tail is turning into the head of the train!

Train winding around the Andes

Lake in the Andes

Coal mining town of Oroya

Restaurant Olimpico

Trout

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Categories: Peru, Rail | Tags: , | Leave a comment

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